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Designing SEP Licensing Negotiation Groups to Reduce Patent Holdout in 5G/IoT Markets

Bowman’s latest publication together with Ruud Peters and Igor Nikolic is now available on SSRN. They discuss how LNGs can be designed to significantly reduce transaction costs and the threat of patent holdout while at the same time curtailing potential antitrust risks, especially regarding SEP implementors in the long tail of new IoT markets.

To read more and to download the paper, please click here.

Online training organized by EPO

Online seminar: High-growth technology business forum – growth-financing

Description

Most technology start-ups and scale-ups need venture capital to finance their high-growth needs. Founders and investors must focus on creating value in the company, to be realised through an exit, i.e. selling the company or launching an IPO. This forum highlights the key role played by IPR (intellectual property rights) portfolios and strategy in attracting investments and increasing company value. The featured live case study will be discussed from the perspective of both founders and investors.

For mor information, please click here.

Bowman Heiden comments on 2021 DOJ-USPTO-NIST Draft Policy Statement

This paper is a succinct response to the request for comments regarding the 2021 draft SEP policy statement by DOJ, USPTO, and NIST. Bo has tried to summarize several key insights from his previous research and policy experience that form the foundation for understanding SEP-enabled standards and SEP policymaking, including:

1. SEP-enabled standards have produced market successes, not market failures
2. Why injunctions do not create patent holdup in the SEP licensing context
3. Without injunctions, SEP licensors are in the weaker bargaining position
4. Is there a need for a DOJ-USPTO-NIST SEP policy statement?

To read more, please click here.

IPBASICS.ORG IS LAUNCHED

LESS IS MORE WHEN IT COMES TO UNDERSTANDING IP RIGHTS

When it comes to understanding intellectual property rights at least one organization has come to believe that less is more. 

A fresh approach to learning why IP rights exist and who they benefit was introduced today by the Center for Intellectual Property Understanding, a non-profit. The CIPU-curated portal makes it easy for everybody to attain basic IP knowledge.

Viewers of all ages and backgrounds can begin to grasp the major IP concepts of sharing and protection through IPBasics.org. Site content features examples and explanations of the four types of intellectual property rights, including NIKE, LEGOS, iPhone, and the Beyonce catalog and products.

To read more, please click here.

A new book by Merima Bruncevic

Regulating Transnational Heritage – Memory, Identity and Diversity.

Book Description

There is a vast body of international and national law that regulates cultural heritage. However, the current regulation remains quite blind to the so called “transnational heritage”. This is heritage where there is no community recognized in law that it can be directly attributed to and that can be responsible for its safekeeping and preservation. It can also be items of heritage where the claim of ownership is disputed between two or more peoples or communities. Transnational heritage challenges the idea of monolithic, mono-cultural, ethno-national states. There are a number of examples of such cultural heritage, for instance the Buddhist Bamiyan statutes in Afghanistan, Palmyra in Syria, the Jewish heritage of Iraq, or various items that are currently housed in large, often Western, museums, as a result of colonial practices. This book explores the regulation of transnational heritage. By discussing many cases of transnational heritage and the problems that arise due to the lack of regulation the book analyses the manifestations of memories and constructions of communities through heritage. It focuses particularly on the concept of community. How are communities constructed in cultural heritage law and what falls outside of the definitions of community? The book underlines that the issues surrounding transnational heritage involve more than a communal right to culture. It is argued that transnational heritage also directly affects wider matters of law such as citizenship, human rights, sovereignty, as well as the movement of people and cultural goods.

For more information, please click here.

Interview with Roberto Castagno

IPR IS ABOUT BUILDING BRIDGES, NOT JUST WALLS

Here is a recent and interesting interview with our CIP advisory board member Roberto Castagno, based on his long experience working with intellectual property.

The head of IPR functions at Neste Oyj since 2020, Roberto Castagno speaks for collaboration at every level: universities and business, lawyers and engineers, economists and patent attorneys.

To read more, please click here.